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Cordyceps (Cordyceps sinensis)



Interactions

Cordyceps/Drug Interactions:
  • AminoglycosidesAminoglycosides: Positive interaction: In a randomized controlled trial, concomitant administration reduced amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity in older people (8).
  • AntiarrhythmicsAntiarrhythmics: In animals, cordyceps had counteraction against aconitine-induced arrhythmia by reducing heart rate and contractility of the papillary muscles or atria (71).
  • AntibioticsAntibiotics: Cordyceps may inhibit the growth of various bacteria, including Clostridium paraputrificum and Clostridiumperfringens (72; 73; 74; 75). It has also been found in animal study to improve microbial flora in the small intestine and act as a substitute for antibiotic growth promoters (75)
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Cordyceps has been reported to increase bleeding time by inhibition of platelet aggregation in vitro and in laboratory animals, although clinical effects of cordyceps causing fluctuations in coagulation times is lacking in humans (4; 76; 66).
  • Antidepressant agents, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)Antidepressant agents, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs): Based on in vitro studies, cultured cordyceps mycelium extracts may exhibit a significant inhibition of monoamine oxidase type B (77; 3).
  • Antidiabetic agentsAntidiabetic agents: Based on animal and laboratory studies, cordyceps may have hypoglycemic effects (67; 68; 69; 70). Theoretically, concurrent use of cordyceps with other agents that lower blood sugar may increase the risk of hypoglycemia.
  • AntihypertensivesAntihypertensives: Based on laboratory study, cordyceps may have hypotensive and vasodilatory effects (32). Theoretically, concurrent use of cordyceps with antihypertensive agents may lead to additive blood pressure-lowering effects.
  • Anti inflammatory agentsAnti inflammatory agents: Cordyceps may possess anti-inflammatory properties through the regulation of TH1/TH2 and subsequent inhibition of the activity of adherence molecule and reduction of IgE production (56).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: In vitro, laboratory, and human data report that the use of cordyceps supplements may decrease total cholesterol and triglycerides and increase HDL (67). Cordyceps has also been reported as a potent antioxidant and to cause antilipid peroxidation via suppression of LDL oxidation (78; 44; 19).
  • Antineoplastic agentsAntineoplastic agents: Cordyceps has been found to display antineoplastic effects by inhibiting the growth of various human tumor cell lines (79; 80; 81; 49; 38; 82; 83), particularly in lung carcinoma (84) and melanoma (38) cell lines, which has been liked to immune stimulation (85).
  • CNS depressantsCNS depressants: Drowsiness has been reported in several individuals taking oral cordyceps (19). Theoretically, concurrent use of cordyceps with CNS depressants may cause additive drowsiness.
  • CorticosteroidsCorticosteroids: Animal studies suggest that cordyceps may induce sex steroid-like effects and act on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (86; 64). Based on laboratory and animal studies, concomitant use may protect helper T-cells and natural killer cells from immunosuppressive drug effects and may increase corticosterone production (87; 85; 64).
  • CyclosporineCyclosporine: Positive interaction: Concomitant administration of cordyceps and cyclosporine may reduce nephrotoxicity in kidney-transplanted patients (58).
  • GentamycinGentamycin: Positive interaction: Based on a laboratory animal study, administration of cordyceps and gentamycin may return blood urea nitrogen (BUN), serum creatinine (SCr), sodium excretion, and urinary NAGase to more normal ranges during drug-induced nephrotoxicity (9).
  • Hormonal agentsHormonal agents: Animal and human studies suggest that cordyceps may induce sex steroid-like effects, act on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and alter male and female sex hormones (31; 64). Based on animal data, cordyceps may stimulate progesterone production (65).
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: In humans, cordyceps demonstrated immune suppressant effects in combination with cyclosporin A and prednisone (21); however, animal and laboratory studies, cordyceps stimulated the immune system(52; 53; 33; 35; 43).
  • Nephrotoxic drugsNephrotoxic drugs: Positive interaction: Concomitant administration may reduce amikacin-induced nephrotoxicity in older people (8).

Cordyceps/Herb/Supplement Interactions:
  • AntiarrhythmicsAntiarrhythmics: In animals, cordyceps had antiarrhythmic properties (71).
  • AntibacterialsAntibacterials: Cordyceps may inhibit the growth of various bacteria, including Clostridium paraputrificum and Clostridiumperfringens (72; 73; 74; 75). It has also been found in animal study to improve microbial flora in the small intestine and act as a substitute for antibiotic growth promoters (75).
  • Anticoagulants and antiplateletsAnticoagulants and antiplatelets: Cordyceps has been reported to increase bleeding time by inhibition of platelet aggregation in vitro and in laboratory animals, although no clinical effect of cordyceps causing fluctuations in coagulation times has been reported in humans (4; 76; 66).
  • Antidepressant agents, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs)Antidepressant agents, monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs): Based on in vitro studies, cultured cordyceps mycelium extracts may exhibit a significant inhibition of monoamine oxidase type B (77; 3). There is the potential for an interaction with MAOIs, although the clinical significance is unclear.
  • Anti inflammatory herbsAnti inflammatory herbs: A proposed mechanism of action for cordyceps anti inflammatory effects is the regulation of TH1/TH2 and subsequent inhibition of the activity of adherence molecule and reduction of IgE production (56).
  • AntilipemicsAntilipemics: In vitro, laboratory, and human data report that the use of cordyceps supplements may decrease total cholesterol and triglycerides and increase HDL (67). Cordyceps has also been reported as a potent antioxidant and can cause antilipid peroxidation via suppression of LDL oxidation (78; 44; 19).
  • AntineoplasticsAntineoplastics: Cordyceps has been found to display antineoplastic effects by inhibiting the growth of various human tumor cell lines (79; 80; 81; 49; 38; 82; 83), particularly in lung carcinoma (84) and melanoma (38) cell lines, which has been liked to immune stimulation (85).
  • Hormonal herbs and supplementsHormonal herbs and supplements: Animal and human studies suggest that cordyceps may induce sex steroid-like effects, act on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis, and alter male and female sex hormones (31; 64). Based on animal data, cordyceps may stimulate progesterone production (65).
  • HypoglycemicsHypoglycemics: Based on animal and laboratory studies, cordyceps may have hypoglycemic effects (67; 68; 69; 70).
  • HypotensivesHypotensives: Based on laboratory study, cordyceps may have hypotensive and vasodilatory effects (32). Theoretically, concurrent use of cordyceps with antihypertensive agents may lead to additive blood pressure-lowering effects.
  • ImmunosuppressantsImmunosuppressants: In humans, cordyceps demonstrated immune suppressant effects in combination with cyclosporin A and prednisone (21); however in animal and laboratory studies, cordyceps stimulated the immune system(52; 53; 33; 35; 43; 3).
  • SedativesSedatives: Drowsiness has been reported in several individuals taking oral cordyceps (19). Theoretically, concurrent use of cordyceps with sedatives may cause additive drowsiness.
  • SteroidsSteroids: Animal studies suggest that cordyceps may induce sex steroid-like effects and acts on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical axis (86; 64). Based on laboratory and animal studies, concomitant use may protect helper T-cells and natural killer cells from the immunosuppressive drug effects and may increase corticosterone production (87; 85; 64).

Cordyceps/Food Interactions:
  • Tyramine-containing foodsTyramine-containing foods: Foods containing large amounts of tyramine, such as aged cheese, chianti wine, and fermented soy products (e.g. miso), may interact with cordyceps (3).

Cordyceps/Lab Interactions:
  • Blood glucoseBlood glucose: Based on animal and laboratory studies, cordyceps may have hypoglycemic effects (67; 68; 69; 70).
  • BUNBUN: Based on human reports and laboratory data, the use of cordyceps may alter BUN levels (23; 9; 42).
  • CD4 countCD4 count: According to human study, cordcyeps has been found to increase CD4 and CD4/CD8 ratio (15).
  • CreatinineCreatinine: Based on human reports and laboratory data, the use of cordyceps may alter creatinine levels (23; 9; 42).
  • Hormone levelsHormone levels: In vitro and human data suggest that cordyceps may increase steroidal hormone production (31; 64).
  • Lipid profileLipid profile: In vitro, laboratory, and human data report that the use of cordyceps supplements may decrease total cholesterol and triglycerides and increase HDL (67).
  • Liver function testsLiver function tests: Based on in vitro and human data, cordyceps may alter hepatic enzymes (15; 68; 16). In a human study, cordyceps decreased SGPT enzyme levels (16).

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The information in this monograph is intended for informational purposes only, and is meant to help users better understand health concerns. Information is based on review of scientific research data, historical practice patterns, and clinical experience. This information should not be interpreted as specific medical advice. Users should consult with a qualified healthcare provider for specific questions regarding therapies, diagnosis and/or health conditions, prior to making therapeutic decisions.

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